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Tuna (approx. 2,5 kg), 1 kg

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260,00 Kn

Karlovačko Radler, 0,50 L x 24

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333,60 Kn

Asbach Uralt, 0,7L

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1.338,00 Kn

Jermann Where the Dreams, 0,75 L

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600,80 Kn

Captain Morgan rum spiced, 0,70 L

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Barton & Guestier Merlot, 0,75 L

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73,60 Kn

Grand Sud Chardonnay, 1 L

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Rosemount Estate GSM, 0,75 L

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277,30 Kn
Total num. of products: 19
Price: 4.388,50 Kn

Zadar

Zadar is a city in Croatia on the Adriatic Sea. It is the centre of Zadar county and the wider northern Dalmatian region. Zadar faces the islands of Ugljan and Pašman, from which it is separated by the narrow Zadar Strait. The promontory on which the old city stands used to be separated from the mainland by a deep moat which has since become a landfill. The harbor, to the north-east of the town, is safe and spacious. Zadar is the seat of a Catholic archbishop. It is a few thousand years old town and it was the capital of Dalmatia for many centuries. The Zadar peninsula still preserves very old network of narrow and charming city streets, as well as a Roman forum dating back to the first century AD. The pre-Romanesque Church of St. Donat dates back to the ninth century, and it is certainly Zadar's most famous spot.

Zadar is also well known for having the attractive Romanesque churches: Cathedral of St. Anastasia from 13th century and Church of St. Chrysogonus from 12th century as well as the church tower of St. Mary dating back from 12th century too. The town is fortified with medieval walls, distinguished for their pretty and impressive ports – entries in the city all dating back to the sixteenth century.

Throughout history, Zadar was the centre of key Croatian and Dalmatian cultural events : the establishment of the first Croatian university (1396), the writing of the first Croatian novel (1536) and the publication of the first Croatian newspaper. The famous permanent exhibition of sacral art and the traditional St. Donat Musical Evenings represent only a small part of numerous cultural events that Zadar offers to its visitors. In antiquity, Iadera and Iader, the much older roots of the settlement's names were hidden, the names being most probably related to a hydrographical term. It was coined by an ancient Mediterranean people and their Pre-Indo-European language. They transmitted it to later settlers, the Liburnians. The name of the Liburnian settlement was first mentioned by a Greek inscription from Pharos (Stari grad) on the island of Hvar in 384 BC, where the citizens of Zadar were noted as Ίαδασινοί (Iadasinoi). According to the Greek source Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax the city was Ίδασσα (Idassa), probably a vulgar Greek form of the original Liburnian name.Zadar gained its urban structure in Roman times; during the time of Julius Caesar and Emperor Augustus, the town was fortified and the city walls with towers and gates were built. On the western side of the town were the forum, the basilica and the temple, while outside the town were the amphitheatre and cemeteries. The aqueduct which supplied the town with water is partially preserved. Inside the ancient town, a medieval town had developed with a series of churches and monasteries being built.

During the Middle Ages, Zadar fully gained its urban aspect, which has been maintained until today. In the first half of the 16th century Venice fortified the town with a new system of defensive walls on the side facing land. In the course of the century architectural building in the Renaissance style was continued and defensive trenches (Foša) were also built. They were completely buried during the Italian occupation until that in 1873, under Austrian rule, the ramparts of Zadar were converted from fortifications into elevated promenades commanding extensive seaward and landward views, thus being the wall lines preserved; of its four old gates one, the Porta Marina, incorporates the relics of a Roman arch, and another, the Porta di Terraferma, was designed in the 16th century by the Veronese artist Michele Sanmicheli. In the bombardments during the Second World War entire blocks were destroyed, but some structures survived.
St. Donatus' Church, a pre-Romanesque church from the 9th century.
St. Mary's Church, located in the old city opposite St. Donatus' Church.
Most important landmarks:

    Roman Forum - the largest on the eastern side of the Adriatic, founded by the first Roman Emperor Augustus, as shown by two stone inscriptions about its completion dating from the 3rd century.
    Most Roman remains were used in the construction of the fortifications, but two squares are embellished with lofty marble columns; a Roman tower stands on the eastern side of the town; and some remains of a Roman aqueduct may be seen outside the ramparts.
The chief interest of Zadar lies in its churches.

    St Donatus' Church - a monumental round building from the 9th century in pre-Romanesque style, traditionally but erroneously said to have been erected on the site of a temple of Juno. It is the most important preserved structure of its period in Dalmatia; the massive dome of the rotunda is surrounded by a vaulted gallery in two stories which also extends around the three apses to the east. The church treasury contains some of the finest Dalmatian metalwork; notably the pastoral staff of Bishop Valaresso (1460).
    St. Anastasia's Cathedral (Croatian: Sv. Stošija), basilica in Romanesque style built in the 12th to 13th century (high Romanesque style), the largest cathedral in Dalmatia.
    The churches of St. Chrysogonus and St. Simeon, where the silver ark or reliquary of St. Simeon (1380) is located, are also fine architectural examples in the Romanesque style.
    St. Krševan's Church - monumental Romanesque church of very fine proportions and refined Romanesque ornaments.
    St. Elijah's Church (Croatian: Sv. Ilija)
    St. Francis' Church, gothic styled church, site of the signing of the Zadar Peace Treaty 1358
    Five Wells Square
    St. Mary's Church, which retains a fine Romanesque campanile from 1105, belongs to a Benedictine Convent founded in 1066 by a noblewoman of Zadar by the name of Cika with The Permanent Ecclesiastical Art Exhibition "The Gold and Silver of Zadar"
Other architectural landmarks:

    Citadel - built in 1409, southwest of the Land gate, it has remained the same to this day.
    The Land Gate - built to a design by the Venetian architect Michele Sanmicheli in 1543
    The unique sea organ
    The Great Arsenal
    Among the other chief buildings are the Loggia del Comune, rebuilt in 1565, and containing a public library; the old palace of the priors, now the governor's residence; and the episcopal palaces.